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Thursday, August 31, 2017

Get the Audiobook of Melkorka! | Joshua Robertson

Originally posted by Joshua Robertson:


61mqedkli6l-_aa300_After six months, the audiobook of Melkorka (Book 1 in The Kaelandur Series) is now available! I spent a long time searching for the perfect voice to cover the wide range of characters in this epic series before finally discovering Fred Wolinsky. You can read the many positive reviews on his website. However, I have to sing his praises too. Not only does Fred have a smooth style which leads the reader/listener for a great experience, he was remarkably easy to work with on the production end. Fred kept me up-to-date throughout the process, asked questions as needed to make certain my world came to life as I saw it, and even finished the project almost six weeks ahead of schedule!
Considering the trilogy is complete, Fred and I are talking about the next steps in producing Dyndaer and Maharia. I will keep you posted! For now, you can snag the audiobook of Melkorka from AmazonAudible, or iTunes.
(Print copies are available where books are sold, or you can snag signed copies off my website.)

RobertsonJoshua Robertson is a bestselling author in dark fantasy, and a writer for Fantasy-Faction. He is also a Licensed Master Social Worker, who received his degree from Wichita State University. He has worked with children and families for the past fifteen years in a variety of unique venues: a residential behavior school, a psychiatric treatment facility, and the child welfare system. He has functioned as a supervisor, an educator, a behavior specialist, and a therapist during his career. Mr. Robertson has presented trainings for hundreds of professionals and military personnel on topics that include child abuse and neglect, human trafficking, strengthening the parent and child relationships, and the neurobiological impact of trauma.
You may recognize him as the dude whose dragons were said to destroy George R.R. Martin’s and Christopher Paolini’s dragons in a very biased Twitter poll. His first novel, Melkorka, was released in 2015, and he has been writing fantasy fiction like clockwork ever since. Known most for his Thrice Nine Legends Saga, Robertson enjoys an ever-expanding and extremely loyal following of readers.
He currently lives in North Carolina with his better half and his horde of goblins.
Add me on Snapchat, Instagram, or Twitter @robertsonwrites

Monday, August 28, 2017

Medieval Monday: Solar Eclipse | Allison D. Reid

Originally posted by Allison D. Reid:


Have your eclipse-watching glasses ready? Or maybe with all the warnings about faulty viewing glasses, you’re just going to hide from it and watch the event on NASA TV. Either way, today’s rare celestial event is fascinating; something beautiful and awe-inspiring…for us. But how did our medieval counterparts feel about it?
This might largely depend on who, and where, you were at the time an eclipse occurred. There were some, like an Anglo Saxon scholar named Bede, who understood that a solar eclipse happened because the moon was passing between the sun and the earth. In one of his scientific texts, he described how “a solar eclipse occurs when the Sun is hidden by the intervention of the Moon, and a lunar eclipse when the Sun, Earth and moon are aligned with Earth in the centre.”
But not everyone would have been knowledgeable about astronomy, and for those who weren’t, the darkening of the sky in the middle of the day would have been a frightening and ominous event. Even if they hadn’t read it for themselves, they would have been taught stories from the Bible concerning periods of darkness, such as during the ten plagues of Egypt, or when Christ died after being crucified. Apocalyptic accounts associated the darkening of the sun with the end of the world. “The Fifteen Signs before Doomsday” was a Middle English text which described the first sign of the apocalypse. The “Sun will give no light and will be cast down to Earth – while you now see it [the Sun] as pleasing and bright, it will become as black as coal.”
It didn’t help that these negative associations with eclipses, and the superstitions people held about them, seemed to be supported by significant events throughout medieval history. Louis of Bavaria, who was Charlemagne’s son and a great Emperor, died shortly after experiencing an eclipse. It was said that he died of fright. Adding to the distress of the Emperor’s death, his sons began a three-year dispute over his succession, which eventually led to the division of Europe into three large areas: Germany, Italy, and France.
The Anglo Saxons later linked an eclipse to a Viking invasion that occurred in 879.
Another solar eclipse happened on August 2, 1133, which could be seen in England and Germany. For both countries, it turned out to be a particularly bad omen. In England, the eclipse could be seen the day after King Henry I departed, and in fact he died in Normandy shortly after. The Germans blamed the same eclipse for the sack of Augsburg and the subsequent massacre of its people by Duke Frederick.
In 1140 William of Malmesbury wrote, ‘There was an eclipse throughout England, and the darkness was so great that people at first thought the world was ending.  Afterwards they realised it was an eclipse, went out, and could see the stars in the sky.  It was thought and said by many, not untruly, that the king would soon lose his power.”
An eclipse was even blamed for the fall of Constantinople in 1453, though in truth a postern gate had been carelessly left open, allowing Turkish soldiers entrance to the city.
There was also an element of inconvenience associated with the darkness of an eclipse. In the 11th century, one observer wrote, “the Sun was obscured for the space of three hours; it was so great that any people who were working indoors could only continue if in the meantime they lit lamps. Indeed some people went from house to house to get lanterns or torches. Many were terrified.”
I wonder if in the Middle Ages they knew to protect their eyes by not looking directly at an eclipse. Even now with all our knowledge, it is reported that about 100 people in the United States go completely blind each time there is an eclipse, and even more sustain damage to their retinas. I can imagine that having even a small number of people go blind in a medieval village or city after an eclipse occurs would only add to the sense of dread that fueled existing medieval beliefs and superstitions.

Want to know more about the Middle Ages? Check out the Medieval Monday Index for additional topics.

Friday, August 25, 2017

Fantasy Art Friday | Allison D. Reid

Originally posted by Allison D. Reid:


Get inspired with this week’s Fantasy Art Friday, where fun fantasy artwork is combined with a writing prompt to get your creative juices flowing.

This small tower blends into the landscape as though it has always belonged here. But who lives inside? Someone who likes their privacy, that much is for certain. Maybe a hermit, who just wants to be left alone, or a monk who has vowed to to live a solitary life of study and prayer. It could be a wizard, who needs peace and quiet for his craft. Impoverished knight? Rogue outlaw? It’s possible that no one lives here at all, and the place is abandoned. It’s pretty overgrown, after all.
Are you bold enough to sneak up and look through the windows, or even go right up and knock on the door? Just remember there’s no help anywhere close by, so I’d be wary of going inside if I were you. 
(Title and Artist Unknown)

Author Spotlight: My Shorts by Arthur M. Doweyko | Renee Scattergood

Originally posted by Renee Scattergood:


Welcome to another Friday Author Spotlight! This week I have Arthur M. Doweyko returning with his science fiction and fantasy short story anthology, My Shorts. He’s going to share an excerpt from one of his short stories with us, but first, let’s get reacquainted.
Arthur has authored over 100 scientific papers, invented novel 3D drug design software, and shares the 2008 Thomas Alva Edison Patent Award for the discovery of Sprycel, a new anti-cancer drug. He writes science fiction and fantasy. His novels include Algorithm (2010 Royal Palm Literary Award, pub 2014, E-Lit), and As Wings Unfurl (Best Pre-Pub Sci-Fi RPLA 2014, pub 2016, Red Adept). He has published numerous award-winning short stories, including Honorable Mentions in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future Competition. He teaches college chemistry and wanders the beaches when not jousting with aliens.

Connect with the Author

About the Book

Mind-blowing science fiction and fantasy short stories designed to make you rethink reality and your place in the universe. From first contact to thinking machines, from time-travel to the brutal realities of space travel, each story is finely crafted to set your teeth on edge and to grip your armchair. A policeman decides the fate of mankind when he unholsters his weapon during a first contact with aliens; Harry meets Harry in a time-travel attempt to save his wife; a little boy discovers he can’t lie; Andrew is the last human, a cyborg who must decide to be upgraded to fully artificial, or not. These and other thought-provoking tales await you in Arthur M. Doweyko’s collection of award-winning shorts.

Get it today on Amazon!

Keep reading for an excerpt from Little Snowy Mountains:

Dr. Armstrong Pearl reached down through loose gravel and shoved his hand beneath the fossilized remains of the sauropod’s tenth cervical vertebra. He felt something that shouldn’t be there. Sweat ran down along his temples, seeped into the gullies and rills of his weathered neck, and emptied into his khaki shirt front. His fingers traced the unmistakable outline of a human eye socket.
Each year, Armstrong volunteered a week of his time to a group of local Montana diggers—paleontologists who were in the midst of unearthing segments of a sixty-five million year old sauropod fossil. This year’s Little Snowy Mountains excavation was about to become sensational.
“Whatcha got there, Armstrong?”
He jerked his hand up. “Nothing. Just trying to get under this verterbra, Johansen.”
“Careful you don’t get stuck and make us dig you out.” Johansen chuckled at his remark. “We’re closin’ shop in a few minutes, so wrap things up.”
After the man wandered away, Armstrong reached down again—this time extending his fingers below the nasal bone. The skull could be the find of the century. Hominids weren’t supposed show up until ten million years after the dinosaurs died out. He clawed away some more debris, and winced as his hand wedged between rock and bone. His forefinger reached the smooth edges of an alveolar margin which preceded the upper teeth.
Johansen had gathered the rest of the group, and called out to him. With one last thrust Armstrong’s fingertip curled around a tooth, loosening it. Gravel sifted back into the hole as he pulled his arm out. He held the specimen up for a closer look. The dying light brought out the tooth’s details, and suddenly, the evening air turned icy cold. He held a human canine, and it sported a ceramic crown.
* * *
“Dr. Pearl, aren’t you off this week?”
“Hi, Sasha. Just a few things to straighten out before I head back out to the dig. How’s business?”
“The crew has things under control. By the way, happy birthday.”
Sixty years was nothing to be happy about.
“Right. See you in a few days.”
Armstrong founded the Pearl’s Pearls dental clinic in Billings a few years before. In the hallway, he held up an x-ray slide to a ceiling fixture, and the blood drained from his face.
“Everything okay?”
Armstrong threw a curt nod to one of his dental associates, Nolan, who had just walked into the building. He hurried out without saying a word. It wasn’t until he angled into his Hummer that he drew enough courage to inspect the slide again. The ceramic cap wasn’t unique, but the same could not be said of the root canal, which contained two lengths of fine wire. Armstrong’s tongue wandered over the inner surface of his uppers. He knew of only one case where a fine wire probe was broken twice—and that was his own canine. He rolled down his window for some air.

Chameleon in a Mirror: A Time Travel Novel by Ruth Nestvold

Meeting Aphra Behn is Billie's wish come true -- and now she's trapped in the 17th century!


Get it today on Amazon!

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Reader Interview: Find Out What Lorie Thinks of My Writing! | Renee Scattergood

Originally posted by Renee Scattergood:



First, I’d like to thank Lorie for taking the time to take my reader interview. I’m always grateful for feedback and I love getting to talk with my readers. If you’d like to take the interview, you’ll find the form here. All I ask is that you’ve at least read one of my books. I mean you can’t tell me what you’ve thought of my writing if you’ve never read anything I wrote. But, you can always download my book, Shadow Stalker Part 1 (Episodes 1 – 6) free.
Okay, let’s find out what Lorie had to say…

Which of my books is your favorite?
Shadow Stalker Serials
What did you like most about that book?
The way it combined tech with indigenous tribal living.
What did you like least about that book?
Nothing really comes to mind. I really enjoyed this.
What do you like most about writing style?
It’s realistic, giving the characters individuality and fullness. It’s very imaginative, taking you on a fast paced trip through different cultures.
Who was your favorite character?
I liked them all because they carried me away collectively.
Would you read more of my work?
Yes.
Why?
I enjoy finding “little gem” authors. Once I do, I keep following their work.

Thanks again, Lorie! I really appreciate it. đŸ˜€

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Tackle your TBR pile in September – Sign up now! | Chris the Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted on Chris the Story Reading Ape's Blog


Sign up now to reduce the length/size of your reading pile.  
September 11th to 24th sees the fifth TackleTBR Readathon, thanks to Tressa at Wishful Endings.
The goal you set is entirely up to you – maybe you don’t even want to set a goal.  
Apart from reading books to shorten your list, though, the readathon includes challenges from participants (with prizes to enter for), activities to join in, and general fun and mayhem.
Read all about it at Wishful Endings and sign up at any time through to 20th September.
I’ll be doing a Goals post on the first day of the Readathon, so you’ll see what I’m planning to read then.
I’ll also be setting you a challenge on 19th September, for which I’ll be giving a prize.

Find out more at:

Tackle your TBR pile in September

#WIP Wednesday: Lot's Going On! | Renee Scattergood

Originally posted by Renee Scattergood:


It’s been a while since my last WIP Wednesday. I have to admit that I haven’t been doing a lot of writing, but I do have a ton going on. A lot of it in my family life, but even more in my writing life.
First, I’m still working on Episode 21 of my Shadow Stalker serial. I’m currently writing Chapter 4, so I’m getting there. I’ve decided with the last few episodes of this serial, I’ll just release them as I write them rather than having set release dates. With my health issues as they are, it just puts less stress on me, and since deciding this I’ve actually been getting more writing done. Yay!
With my future serial, I’m going to write an entire season first (22 episodes which are shorter than the Shadow Stalker episodes), then set a release schedule for each episode, the mini bundles (which will be 4 or 5 episodes each), and the season bundle (which will be all 22 episodes).
The reason I’m doing it this way is so readers don’t have to wait so long in between each episode. I’ll be releasing the individual episodes every two weeks. The price will be set at 25 cents per episode. For people who prefer to buy from Amazon, Barnes & Noble or the other online retailers, I’m putting together the mini bundles since I can’t set the price lower than 99 cents. Those will be released every couple of months or so (depending on how many episodes there are in each).
As far as my novels, I’m still working on A God’s Deception. Rather than just planning out the first book, I’ve decided to plan out the entire series first. I’m also considering writing the entire series before releasing the individual books. There are many advantages to this. One that I really like is that I can make changes to earlier books as I’m writing. One I know most of my readers will like is that I can release the books closer together so there won’t be a long wait between books.
I’m doing a survey now on my newsletter asking my readers their opinion on whether they want me to release the books as I write them, or if they’d prefer waiting until the entire series is written. If you’d like to get a word in on it, sign up here before the end of the month and let me know which you’d prefer.
Also, at the request of my daughter, I’m starting a new middle-grade series based on the daughter of one of my Shadow Stalker characters. I don’t want to say who because I don’t want to give out spoilers for those who haven’t read Shadow Stalker yet. My daughter is a budding artist and will be doing the artwork for this series as well. It’s really exciting for both of us to have a project to work on together.
That’s about it for now. Have a great week and happy reading!

Time is Running Out! | Allison D. Reid

Originally posted by Allison D. Reid:


The Rafflecopter giveaway for my newsletter subscribers will be coming to an end very soon. Don’t miss your chance to win an autographed copy of Into the Shadow Wooda companion book to Journey to Aviad.
Not subscribed yet? Feel free to take a look at my last newsletter.  In this edition, the feature article “It’s Not Easy Being ‘Clean,'” talks about the difficulty I have finding “clean” entertainment, and how my own works are viewed by others because they lack adult content. There is another author update and links to a couple of giveaways for LOTS of free books. When you  sign up for my newsletter, you’ll also get a free e-copy of Book 2 in my series, Ancient Voices: Into the Depths. You can unsubscribe at any time, so really you’ve got nothing to lose!
Want the chance to win an autographed copy of Into the Shadow Wood?
Step 1: Subscribe to my newsletter and download your free ebook
Step 2: Enter the giveaway
That’s it! The winner will be announced in my September newsletter. Good luck!

ENJOY AN EXCERPT FROM INTO THE SHADOW WOOD

Our weather-worn tents were nestled into a small clearing, like growing things that had sprung up out of the ground. There were so few of us left…so few. Remaining were the stubborn, the desperate—those who, like me, simply couldn’t let go. Something was still driving us to fight—to hope—in spite of the brutal truth that we had lost. What are we still doing here? This decision to go on is folly. Alaric’s words echoed in my mind. They rang no less true now than they had in the heart of the Shadow Wood.
Though I had escaped the confines of its borders, the Wood had not released its hold on my mind, and my nights continued to be filled with its dark torments. I slept fitfully, with a knife in my fist and my bow close at hand…just in case. The Shadow mocked my inner pain, whispering words of despair to my soul; I would never be free. Each morning I bathed in a nearby stream, scrubbing my skin nearly raw, shaving my face, and grooming my hair. No matter how vigorously I washed, I could still feel the slick residue of the Wood’s filth, and my lungs were heavy with its thick air. When I caught glimpses of my reflection in still pools, the face looking back at me seemed not my own. And it was not only my looks that startled me. At meal times, despite my best intentions, I ate like a crazed, half-starved animal. My brethren no doubt saw me as such judging by the cautious looks I caught from the corners of my eyes. So far, none of them had dared to ask about my journey into the abyss—they seemed afraid to know what could have possibly reduced me to such a state.

BOOK DESCRIPTION: INTO THE SHADOW WOOD

Once a proud member of the Sovereign’s prestigious personal guard, Einar has lost everything: his home, his Sovereign, and his purpose. Most of his closest friends have either been killed in battle or executed. His friend Nevon died trying to fulfill a dangerous oath…one that Einar disagreed with, but now feels honor-bound to take up in his stead. The quest plunges Einar into the depths of the dark and twisted Shadow Wood, testing the limits of his strength, his beliefs, and his sanity. What he finds in the Wood is far more ominous than anything he’d expected. If he’s not careful, Nevon’s fate might end up being his own.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Special Feature: The Stones of Earth and Air by V.M. Sang | Renee Scattergood

Originally posted by Renee Scattergood:


New Release!

After the Crown Prince of Ponderia starts behaving strangely, his best friend Pettic discovers that the prince has been replaced by a doppelganger, and the real prince kidnapped.
Unable to accept the loss of his friend, Prince Torren, nor the cruel impostor to become the new king, Pettic sets on a quest to rescue his friend. After he sees the fake prince meet a mysterious man, Pettic discovers that the prince has been imprisoned in another plane of existence.
With the help of Blundo, the court magician, Pettic finds out that the only way to enter this another world are four keys, each of them associated with a different element. As Pettic sets on his seemingly impossible quest, he discovers that the four lands that hold the keys are all vastly different… and more dangerous than he could have ever imagined.

Get it today on Amazon!

Monday, August 21, 2017

Simulation by M. Black

SIMULATION is a YA Climate Fiction Dystopian, and is the DEBUT release from Dystopian author M. Black. Along the lines of City of Ember meets CW’s The 100, this story will capture your heart and still won’t let go...even at the end. Written in part while listening to Outside by Ellie Goulding, this story contrasts technology to nature, rich to poor, privilege to hardship, and illusion to reality.

A bowl of YA, a splash of dystopia, and a dash of science fiction.

“No one is getting in but whom we allow, and no one is ever getting out.”

Set in 2175 in Colorado, USA, where Citigogs are the new form of cities and citizens are kept under a careful population control, we meet Ilia the Princess of our main Citigog named Iliad, and Jez a Giver. As Ilia spends more time with Jez, she finds herself drawn to the Outside and ventures out of her Citigog only to learn that everything is not what it seems.

Get it today on Amazon!

Medieval Monday: Fire! Fire! | Allison D. Reid

Originally posted by Allison D. Reid:


Fire was crucial to survival in the Middle Ages. With electricity and gas-powered devices still far into the future, open flame was the most common source of heat for cooking, industry, and protection against the cold. Fires were a bit more difficult to set in an era before matches, particularly if everything was wet. Fire-steels, flint, or pyrite (struck against iron to produce a spark) might be carried in a leather pouch along with tinder. Tinder could be dried brush, straw, birch bark, rotten wood, pine needles, wood shavings, small twigs, or char-cloth. Char-cloth was made by briefly catching a bit of clean linen on fire, then putting the fire out. The resulting bit of blackened fiber could be saved for later and easily caught fire. Once a fire had been successfully lit, the resulting coals were protected with fire covers or other means. It was more convenient to revive a fire from still-hot coals than to start one from scratch.
As much as fire was a necessity to life, it was also a significant hazard in the medieval world. Stone and brick were prohibitively expensive building materials for the average person. Most buildings were made of wattle and daub with thatch roofs, and straw beds were often pulled close to hearth fires—all of these materials burned quickly once lit. In cities, the buildings were also built very close together, so if one building went up in flames, those near it would likely burn down as well. Many towns throughout Europe were at one point or other devastated by fire, whether by lit by accident, invaders, or even lightning. After 1213, London forbade thatch roofing in favor of shingles and tile, though other towns were slow to do the same.
Cook houses and kitchens were sometimes built separate from other structures because they were such a common fire hazard. Brewers and barbers were tightly regulated for the same reason. They were all required to have their buildings whitewashed and plastered, both inside and out. Fires posed not only a threat to people and livestock, but to the longevity of the community if large food stores and other structures or supplies vital to survival were destroyed.
Imagine trying to fight a large fire with no hydrants, hoses, firetrucks, extinguishers, or any other modern equipment. In some cities access to water was already at a premium, and even with a large water source close by, there was no fast delivery system. Firefighting equipment of the day was buckets of water, firehooks to pull down thatch and compromised buildings, and lots of manpower. Each home was required to have a full container of water ready and waiting outside the front door, and every citizen was obligated to assist when a fire broke out.
While stone buildings were safer, they were not impervious to fire, and even castles could be destroyed by it. Starting fires was often a tactic used by those laying siege to a castle or keep. Catapults could fling flaming objects over the stone walls in the hopes of catching something flammable on the other side. Once started, such fires were very difficult if not impossible to extinguish.
On a personal note, I once visited a still-habited castle in Germany (sadly, I cannot remember its name) which burned in modern times much as structures would have burned in the medieval era. A fire was started on a cold winter night when embers from an untended fireplace lit a rug on fire. There were no hydrants or sprinkler systems—the firemen had to draw water from the river below the castle. But it was so uncharacteristically cold that the water was freezing in the hoses on the way up. Like ancient times, citizens were called upon to try to save the castle by bucket-brigade.
I remember seeing aerial photographs immortalized on informational plaques at the site, showing the sections that had burned. The original walls remained standing upright, but everything inside of them was gone, right down to the bare earth below. The owners had spent many years after (along with a small fortune) restoring the castle, though countless irreplaceable pieces of history had been lost forever.
It has been close to 30 years since I visited that place on a leisurely afternoon, and enjoyed piece of Black Forest cake in the cafĂ© just below it. But it obviously made a strong impression on me, as sights and tales of fires would have made an even stronger impression on those so vulnerable to them in the medieval era. Such events were in fact one of the ways medieval people marked the passage of time before watches and calendars were commonplace items. Everyone would remember the year the river flooded, or lightning hit the church steeple…or the local castle burned to the ground on a frigid, winter night.

Want to know more about the Middle Ages? Check out the Medieval Monday Index for additional topics.

Guest Post: 7 Things That Will Make You a Superb Fiction Writer by Jade Parker | Renee Scattergood

Originally posted by Renee Scattergood:



A lot of people read books, although it sounds a little strange in the year of 2017. And you would be surprised to know how many writers are there globally. It looks like more than 75 thousand books are uploaded to the Kindle store on a monthly basis.
It’s obviously a harsh competition for young writers out there. But there is still enough room for fresh talents to grab their share in case they prepare for the challenge. All you need to do is to come up with a good idea, create a writing strategy, and work hard to develop it. If you are still wondering how to do all that, just move on with our article.
Top 7 tips for successful fiction writing
The best fiction novelists always create a specific way of writing or come up with a unique style and text structure. However, there are some writing rules common to all novelists. Here are the 7 most important ones.
  • Be creative with the plot
Successful fiction novels are based on great plots. This is the part where your imagination should play the lead role. Give your best to offer readers the most interesting storyline, well-developed characters, and short and simple paragraphs. Of course, it’s usually easier to say than to do this, so you can put some extra efforts into this stage of the writing process. We recommend you two things:
– Engage in online communities. Online platforms and groups dedicated to fiction writing are full of experienced professionals and passionate readers. They can offer you many valuable ideas or put remarks to stories that you thought were perfect.
– Consult with the colleagues or writing services Like https://www.assignmentmasters.co.uk/ The fact that you compete in the same market doesn’t mean that you are not allowed to talk to your colleagues. Most of the writers go through same problems throughout careers and you can often find help during discussions with rivals.
  • Start strong
The best way to keep the readers interested in your book is to start as close to the end as possible. It may sound strange but just think about it for a minute. How many times have you seen a movie starting from what seems to be the final scene and then you can’t wait to see what really happened in the end?
The principle is the same when it comes to fiction writing. Once you get the readers hooked to the story, they won’t be able to let go of the book until they find out about the unfolding. This is the perfect way to make a bunch of passionate readers.
  • End chapters stylishly
It’s true that the previous tip will attract many readers but it is still very important to keep them engaged all the way throughout the book. It means that you should make each chapter a special story with the cliff-hanging end which will resolve in the next section. This model is great to preserve impatient readers who don’t have enough diligence to read the entire book.
In order to achieve this point, you also need a few side stories to support the main line of events. Using subplots, you will add some spice to the novel and attract the wavering booklovers.
  • Happy is not good
Yes, almost all readers love to see the happy ending. But it doesn’t suggest that you should make a whole novel based on joyful and upbeat characters. Do you remember the famous opening line to Leo Tolstoy’s novel Anna Karenina? He wrote: “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”
This essentially means that happy is boring. You should design characters that will suffer and face enormous challenges in life. That way, you make a perfect background for the plot and leave the readers wondering about the resolution.
  • Give them someone to root for
If you want to be a great writer, you must know that readers need to relate to your characters. Therefore, you should always create one character that the reader would like to root for. Readers see such character as their alter ego and deep inside they are anxious to see if he/she will succeed.
It even doesn’t have to be the main character. It is much easier to find yourself in some average Joe from the neighborhood than in the superhero. This once again puts an emphasis on side stories and the characters that cover subplots.
  • Avoid clichĂ©s
No matter how successful it might have proved in the past, don’t ever use the plot that everybody knows for ages. Sometimes it’s rather difficult to come up with a brand new idea but that’s what fiction writing is all about. If you really can’t create anything better than the common story pattern, try to take another point of view or put some other character on the center stage.
Sometimes even the smallest changes to the clichĂ© make an entirely different outcome. Additionally, you must also do your best to avoid the washed out phrases and expressions. Prove your writing skills through relatively new discourse, even if it means using slang where necessary. Anything is better than clichĂ©.
  • Surprise the readers
The surprise is a crucial element of fiction writing. If your readers know exactly what is about to happen in the next scene, be sure that you are not a good novelist. Put your characters in unexpected situations and find alternative solutions to the crisis.
You can imagine each scene and list the possible outcomes. When you do that, always skip the ideas that instantly come to your mind. The reason is simple – your readers will probably think about the same option, too. Let the readers worry about your characters, it’s the basic principle of great writing.
Conclusion
In the world full of fiction novels, it is not easy to make a good reputation and distinguish yourself from your peers. However, huge competition doesn’t make it mission impossible. You need a decent writing plan, a nice plot, and some tricks to attract the readers. Following our advice here, you’ll be on the right path to achieve all this. So go on and write, we expect to hear about your new novel soon.

AUTHOR BIO
Jade Parker is a branding expert who enjoys reading tons of fiction novels. Needless to say, she became a very strict critic in the process. Despite her extra-curricular work as a personal consultant Jade still has enough time to help writers, companies and entrepreneurs create their online brand presence.