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Monday, September 25, 2017

Medieval Monday: Turning Flax into Linen | Allison D. Reid

Originally posted by Allison D. Reid:


Flax was an important plant in the medieval world. It had an incredible number of uses, some of which have already been touched on in previous posts. One of its primary uses was the production of linen cloth. Cotton didn’t grow well in northern areas of Europe, but flax did, and linen was needed to make undergarments and cooler summer clothing when wool was too hot to wear.
Harvesting and processing flax was a June activity in the Middle Ages. Like so many other medieval tasks, it was a laborious and time consuming one, and it started with either pulling up the entire plant, or cutting the stalks down to the ground. Before anything else could be done, all of the seeds would have to be carefully removed so that they could either be used for their oil, or saved for planting a new crop of flax.
Retting Flax
Retting
The next step in the process was retting. The most popular method of doing this was to leave the stalks in water to rot for between 3-6 weeks. This method was the fastest and it whitened the fibers, which was preferable. Since a large amount of water was necessary, ponds and streams were used, even though this tended to pollute the water. Retting in a water source that also served as the community’s drinking water was likely to make you very unpopular, and eventually laws were put in place to limit this type of retting. Another method of retting, if a water source was not available, was to bind the flax stalks in bundles and leave them out for the dew to break them down, turning the bundles on occasion. This method took considerably longer, possibly several months, and the resulting fibers were not as white.
combing fibers
Hackling linen fibers
Once the stalks of flax had rotted, the flax would be dried out and then beaten between wooden blocks to break them apart—a process that was sometimes called beetling. Next would come scutching, where the woody bits of the plant were finally removed from the silky fibers inside. The last step was hackling; combing the fibers into separate lengths that could finally be spun into thread, then woven into cloth.
The end result of all this work was a beautiful, versatile fabric that could be cut and sewn into garments, as these women from the 14th century are doing.
women sewing linen

Invasion Survivor by Hayley lawson

Humanity has one option.
Evacuate Earth.


After a wave of fear crashes over the world in response to a deadly virus. Fear intensifies when it's discovered that the virus is the first wave of attack by an alien race that wants Earth for themselves.

It's one day before Paige's eighteenth birthday, and the world is turning into the walking dead! Zombie-like people are seeking her out.

What the hell! Just Paige's luck.

Can Paige rescue her family and get off the planet before The Wave captures her?


Get it today on Amazon!

Saturday, September 23, 2017

I've been featured on #InstaFreebie! Please check it out and share! | Renee Scattergood

Originally posted by Renee Scattergood:


I got an email last week from InstaFreebie telling me I was selected to be featured on their blog. I was so excited! :-D
Please check it out, download the free book if you haven’t already, and share it with your friends, family and followers!
Thanks so much!